Author Archive

Nathaniel Bacon Sources

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/amerbegin/power/text5/BaconsRebellion.pdf

-1705, modernized 2006

-article

-It has a lot of details about Nathaniel Bacon’s Rebellion.

-has a lot more Details about Bacon’s Rebellion because it was written a long time ago

-help us get more details about the rebellion.

 

http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/bacon_nathaniel_1647-1676

-April 29, 2010

-article

-it tells about Nathaniel Bacon’s Life

-It is one of the only things I could find that told about his whole life and not just the rebellion.

-We will use it for what we tell about his early life.

http://www.nps.gov/jame/historyculture/bacons-rebellion.htm

-June 1987

-article

-About Bacon’s Rebellion

-Interesting, easy to read, written by historian in that area.

-Help us get in details about the rebellion.

March 20, 2014 at 4:29 pm Leave a comment

Basketball

Mark Handel

3/6/14

 

James Naismith invented the sport of basketball in the winter of 1891-1892 to keep his students in a physical education class occupied.

 

What type of people played this sport?

Men in college or older usually played the sport.  Blacks didn’t play until 1902 when they allowed Bucky Lew to play.

 

Was it played professionally?  If so by whom?

It was first played professionally in 1898.  The first known basketball game was on November 7, 1896.  The first teams came from the bigger cities on the East coast.

 

What equipment did they use to play it?

When basketball was first invented, they used a peach basket and a ball.  They first used a regular soccer ball before they came out with a basketball.  Later, they switched to rings so they didn’t have to fetch the ball when it was in the peach basket.

Was it played by schools and colleges?

Colleges started taking interest in basketball in 1901.  Basketball was played by many colleges including Trenton, Minnesota, Utah, Chicago, and Columbia.

 

How does it differ from the modern day sport?

One of the things that was different about it was that when it first started the ball was shot into a peach basket rather than a hoop.  When it first came out, the players were not allowed to dribble the ball.  Instead, when the received the ball, they either had to shoot a basket or pass to another team player.

 

Why is the history of sports important?

The history of sports can help you know why they are played or you can learn about the culture of the country which came up with the sport.

 

Sources

http://nbahoopsonline.com/Articles/History1.html

http://www.springfieldcollege.edu/welcome/birthplace-of-basketball/index#.UxjdDIVWhRw

http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0875085.html

 

March 6, 2014 at 9:45 pm Leave a comment

Schools in the 1800’s

In the early 1800’s children went to a one room school house.  They were grouped by what grade they were in with the younger children in front.  The teacher was chosen by the parents of the children and if he or she did a good job they were well respected in the town.  The parents paid the teacher and if they didn’t have enough money gave them food or clothes or other things to pay.  The children were taught mainly from Noah Webster’s American Spelling Book, but also used William McGuffey’s Eclectic readers. These books taught the students the different subjects that they needed to learn.  The classes went from 9:00 to 4:00 each day and they had an hour off from 12:00 to 1:00 to eat lunch and have recess.  There was only school in summer and winter, because spring was planting and fall was harvesting.

The government wasn’t evolved in schooling yet because it was the parent’s choice if they wanted their children to go to school.  I think that the system we use today is better because the teacher is for 1 grade only and the students can listen to them the whole time, and not have to worry about where or not she was speaking to your section.

Sources

http://library.thinkquest.org/J002606/mid1800s.html

http://www.northwesthistoryexpress.com/timeline/education1800.php

http://nashuaschoolhouse.com/Country_School_Life.html

December 11, 2013 at 2:30 pm 5 comments

The Monroe Doctrine

The Monroe Doctrine basically said that the United States would not meddle in European affairs that did not concern it.  The Monroe Doctrine more specifically warned Europe that America was not allowed to be colonized by any new European power and that America would stay out of Europe.  The significance of the Monroe Doctrine was that the United States could expand in their country, and that other countries would not try to settle empty land before them.  The Monroe Doctrine warned many countries including Russia, Spain, and England.  In fact because of the Monroe Doctrine Russia backed out of the Oregon country.  I would say that the Monroe doctrine was honored because later it was expanded and reinterpreted.

Sources

http://history.state.gov/milestones/1801-1829/monroe

http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/monroe/aa_monroe_doctrine_1.html

November 13, 2013 at 4:43 pm Leave a comment

Napoleon

 Napoleon influenced the New World by selling the big chunk of land called Louisiana to America.  He was interested in the New World because North America could provide the French West Indies with food.  He would have kept the land for awhile except that there was a war coming on with the British and Napoleon needed money badly.  So he decided to sell the whole Louisiana Territory to the Americans instead of just some of it.  Napoleon influenced mainly Louisiana and a few states around it.  Before Napoleon agreed to sell it to the U.S., Thomas Jefferson said to try to get part of the territory at a reasonable price.  If this wasn’t possible, then try to form an ally with France’s enemy Great Britain and attempt to take New Orleans by force.  If I was ruling France at this time I probably would have done the same thing Napoleon did because there was a war coming on with my enemy, the British, and I needed money badly.

Sources

 http://web.ebscohost.com/hrc/detail?sid=142cf4d1-ab4c-4420-abba-6b9d5b0ee354%40sessionmgr111&vid=1&hid=113&bdata=JnNpdGU9aHJjLWxpdmU%3d#db=khh&AN=17910616

http://web.ebscohost.com/hrc/detail?sid=63b9353b-7b6a-4a44-9db5-07eba1725c8a%40sessionmgr115&vid=1&hid=113&bdata=JnNpdGU9aHJjLWxpdmU%3d#db=khh&AN=50499921

http://web.ebscohost.com/hrc/detail?sid=d4addcdc-1224-413a-80b5-f263234ea54d%40sessionmgr115&vid=1&hid=113&bdata=JnNpdGU9aHJjLWxpdmU%3d#db=khh&AN=31615103

November 7, 2013 at 11:19 am 3 comments

Germans in the american colonies

Germans were a major immigrating force in the American colonies.  I chose Germany because my last name which is Handel, is German.  The German settlers came because they sought religious freedom.  Most of the Germans settled in Pennsylvania and became known as the Pennsylvania Dutch.  Some of the different groups were the Mennonites, Amish, German Reformed, Dunkers, and the Schwenkfelders.  The Germans influenced the shaping of Government, Foods, and Family Structure in the following ways.

Government – Germans immigrated to find religious and political freedom.  Unfortunately, the rich aristocrats were the ruling party, and took little interest in lower class citizens.  The common people, who were immigrants, could not speak fluid English.  They were often treated worse than slaves.  As a result, the common people seized the aristocratic government and shipped then back to England.  In order to have protection from the French, they elected a German named Jacob Leisler as their new governor.  Leisler was convinced that unless the French were driven from Canada, the colonies would not be safe.  He attempted to attack Quebec, but was unsuccessful.  After the failed attack, a new governor came from England and took command.  The aristocrats spread lies about Leisler and convinced the new governor while drunk to sign a death penalty for Leisler.  As a result, Leisler was hanged.

Foods – Some of the foods that the Germans brought over to the American colonies were chocolate, hot dogs, hamburgers, sausages, cheeses, breads, beer, and wine.

Family Structure – Most German families were farmers.  They brought a large amount of knowledge about farming from Germany.  The families spent long days in the fields working.  As a result of the aristocratic government, they continued to speak German and grouped themselves into settlements with other Germans.  One of the traditions brought over from the Germans was the Christmas tree.

 

http://www.pennsylvaniaroots.com

http://www.germanheritage.com/Publications/cronau/cronau6.html

http://www.germanfoodguide.com

 

 

October 3, 2013 at 6:50 pm 3 comments

Harvard and William & Mary

William and Mary’s College was founded as an Anglican school in 1693 by King William III and Queen Mary of England.  They signed the charter for the college.  It was the first college to offer an elective system of study.  This system allowed the students to choose their own courses.  Surprisingly, I did not find anything about being a Christian school on their website, despite being founded by Anglican beliefs.  However, in 1906 it became a state supported school.  That might be why it doesn’t have anything to do with Christianity today.  Some famous people who graduated from the college are Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and John Tyler.

Harvard was founded in 1636 by the great and general court of Massachusetts Bay Colony.  The college was named after a young minister, John Harvard, who gave his library and half of his estate to the college when he died.  Harvard started with nine students and one teacher.  Today, Harvard has more than 20,000 students and over 2,000 teachers.  Harvard might have started losing its Christian beliefs when Charles William Eliot became president in 1869.  I think this because he changed the rules so that undergraduates could pick most of their own classes, which means that the students may have not picked Bible classes since they weren’t required.  Before this time most of the presidents were formally pastors, afterwards most of them weren’t.

 

References

World Book Encyclopedia, 2004

http://www.wm.edu/index.php

http://www.harvard.edu

 

 

 

September 25, 2013 at 7:17 pm 2 comments

Older Posts